prevero Blog

FP&A Data Viz Question #3: Does Your Graph Actually WORK?

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

FP&A Data Viz Question #3: Does Your Graph Actually WORK?

We’re making good progress! You’ve decided that a graph is the right way to present your FP&A information (Data Viz Question #1) and chosen the right chart type. But we’re not finished yet – now you must address Question #3:

What changes and additions to the graph will help your audience understand its central messages quickly and accurately? Will visual effects that “beautify” the graph help or hurt that objective?

Written by Randall Bolten

Data Viz Question #1: Is Graphing the Right Choice?

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Data Viz Question #1: Is Graphing the Right Choice?

In my last article, I listed four questions you should ask yourself, and the order you should ask them in, if you are an FP&A professional considering using data visualization to communicate your information. In this article, we address Question #1: Which is the most effective way to impart your key information – a table or a graph? 

Written by Randall Bolten

FP&A Data Visualization: Don’t Skip ANY of These Questions!

Tuesday, 04 July 2017

FP&A Data Visualization: Don’t Skip ANY of These Questions!

Data visualization – or graphing, to use a more plebeian synonym – is one of the hottest buzzwords in FP&A today… right up there with “big data” and “predictive analytics”. It can certainly be an immensely powerful tool for helping your audience grasp your most important points. And it’s getting more powerful – in addition to good old Excel’s already-lengthy list of graphing capabilities, there’s an increasing number of excellent data visualization software products.

Written by Randall Bolten

Learning to love risk

Thursday, 22 June 2017

Learning to love risk

If measurement – or the lack of it – is the biggest weakness in most forecasting processes, risk is the least well understood concept…mainly because it is something that we think we understand, but we don’t.

Written by Steve Morlidge

Playing Golf in the Dark

Thursday, 15 June 2017

Playing Golf in the Dark

About the only thing that everyone seemed to agree on in my old company was that forecasting was really important and that our forecasts were poor. But when I asked people how they knew that they were no good I got a variety of answers rather like the one a judge once gave when asked to give a definition of pornography: ‘I know it when I see it”.

Written by Steve Morlidge

We need a rolling forecast! Really? Why?

Tuesday, 06 June 2017

We need a rolling forecast! Really? Why?

I’d like to claim that I am not easily annoyed….but that would be untrue. And one of the things that is guaranteed to irritate me are glib statements from people who claim to be experts – particularly if it is part of an act to get people to buy something.

Written by Steve Morlidge

How do forecasts differ from budgets?

Tuesday, 23 May 2017

How do forecasts differ from budgets?

In a previous blog post I mentioned that people who are highly sensitive to the lack of flexibility of traditional budgeting often see rolling forecasts as the answer. If we update our view of the future more frequently and don’t confine it to the financial year it is obvious that this will be more useful than traditional annual budgets based on the financial year.

Written by Steve Morlidge

Engineering Trust

Tuesday, 09 May 2017

Engineering Trust

In the last blog I described how it is possible to implement Beyond Budgeting in a step-by-step fashion.

If you choose to go down this route you will become increasingly uncomfortably aware of a disconnect between Beyond Budgeting style processes and the rules and routines that govern normal business life in a traditional organisation.

Written by Steve Morlidge

Traditional Budgeting: what are the alternatives?

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Traditional Budgeting: what are the alternatives?

In the first blog in this series I asked the question: ’why, when everyone hates it, do we still have traditional budgeting?’ My tentative answer to this was that that most people were not aware of the alternatives.

This blog will describe some of the candidates and assess to what extent they address the weaknesses of traditional budgeting that I outlined: cost, timeliness, dysfunctional behaviour and inflexibility.

Written by Steve Morlidge

Why budget?

Tuesday, 11 April 2017

Why budget?

It’s difficult to think of a business process that is more unpopular than budgeting.

In nearly two decades of writing and talking on the subject I have yet to come across anyone who is prepared to stand up and say it is a good thing.

Before trying to answer the obvious question ‘why do we still do it, then’, it is worth reminding ourselves of the charge sheet levied against corporate budgeting:

Written by Steve Morlidge

The Future of Business Analytics Systems

Tuesday, 04 April 2017

The Future of Business Analytics Systems

Trying to predict the future of Business Analytics falls somewhere between the realms of technology hype and fantasy. There is no doubt that the size of data sets and the speed of analyses will continue to grow, but their success in business is rarely measured in these terms. What really counts is whether those systems can demonstrably bring about improved performance that would not be other realized.

Written by Michael Coveney

Towards Analytic Maturity

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Towards Analytic Maturity

The volume of data available today is staggering. It is estimated that every 60 seconds around 1,820 Terabytes of data will have been created, 700,000 Google searches performed along with 98,000+ tweets and 11 million instant messages. Of course not all will be relevant to your organisation, but if data represents the ever changing requirement of our customers, shouldn’t we be interested?

Written by Michael Coveney

7 Key Analytic Models

Tuesday, 21 March 2017

7 Key Analytic Models

As stated in my blog ‘Using Analytic Models’, the role of planning is to help manage what can be controlled (i.e. the organisation’s business processes, the resources it applies to those processes,  and the volume and quality of work done in those processes) to produce outcomes that will achieve organisational objectives, within an uncontrollable and unknowable external environment.

Written by Michael Coveney